What is an OEM?

OEM stands for Original Equipment Manufacturer which basically means the people that built the part. There are many OEMs out there but we’ll focus on the ones that drive our industry. Here are a few you should get to know:

– General Electric
– CFM International
– Safran
– Pratt & Whitney
– Boeing
– Airbus
– Embraer
– Honeywell
– Rockwell Collins
– UTC Aerospace Systems
– Liebherr
– Meggitt

There are countless others that make up the internal systems of an airplane. OEMs are important because they build the sub-systems that make up the “guts” of an airplane. For example, take a Boeing 737-800, one of the most popular selling planes in the world. Do you think Boeing makes the whole airplane from scratch? I used to when I was little, but we’re not little anymore. The actual tube, called a fuselage, is made by Spirit Aerosystems. Engines are built by CFM International, tires, brakes, slides, windows, seats, toilets…all come together for the big a dance that is making a B737. Here’s a pretty great video about how the plane is actually built:

So the next someone asks, what is an OEM? Original Equipment Manufacturer. OEMs closed.

The Wonderful World of Finance

Before we begin down this path, I would like to disclose that I am not a financial professional but merely a new student of finance. The topics I discuss here are not to be taken as advice nor endorsements of investments or financial services. This is merely an outlet to discuss topics I’m learning about in my finance studies in hopes of sparking your interest to learn more and go beyond the scope of this blog. I’m not the Wolf of Wall Street nor am I pretending to be the next Warren Buffet. I am simply presenting information as best I can so you can go learn more and make your own decisions. Why though?

In my studies of finance I have learned things that have real world consequences for anyone on “main” street. From amortization schedules to budgeting, credit and risk, to savings and retirement. The financial system is intertwined with everything in your life, from a car loan and credit card, to your eventual retirement account and fixed income. I’m not saying you need to turn into a wall street shark and trade your way to richness. That’s not what I’m saying at all. What I am saying is that you need to learn the basics so you can understand what’s going on around you when it comes to finance. Lenders can take advantage of you if you don’t know what you’re signing up for or worse, ruin your credit score because you find yourself not able to pay for it.

So the basis for this section is to educate ourselves so we can have a grasp of what’s going on around us, make better financial decisions, and set up a track to meet goals in the near-mid-and long terms. Let me stress this again, this is not a get rich quick scheme or a beat the market promise. I wouldn’t be blogging right now if that were the case. This is a concise and systematic effort to learn and apply techniques that can benefit one financially. Let’s close on some finance knowledge. Because knowledge is $$$.


Words of Wisdom from the Father

For those just starting out in aviation or thinking about getting into aviation, I offer the single most important advice my father ever taught me. This can apply to every industry, but it’s especially important in ours.

<Always protect your reputation, it is everything>

The aviation industry, in particular the aftermarket side, is a small small world after all. There are plenty of companies in the space, but the people you start to deal with on daily basis, start becoming friends and family. It’s an odd phenomenon, but if you ask most people they will tell you that they work among friends, not colleagues. This can be a really positive thing, or a really negative thing depending on your circumstance. But the most important concept to realize is that because it’s such a “small” space, how you treat people and the promises you deliver on (or don’t deliver on) can follow you around for life. Most people work on a basis of trust and a trend of experiences they’ve had dealing with you. If you’re sharp, treat people the way you want to be treated, and become TRUSTWORTHY, this industry will take care of you for the long haul. But, if you cross people the wrong way, do shady things that call your integrity into question, you’re not going to last very long.

My father has been in aviation for 30+ years and some of those same people who worked with him in the past, still reach out to him because they know he is a man of integrity and has the experience to back it up. This is what I aspire to in my career, and I think I’m doing a pretty good job. There’s an unspoken code among aviation professionals and you can easily tell who’s “got it” and who doesn’t. You need some experience under your belt before you’re fluent, but just remember the golden rule. No, it’s not he who has the gold…trust me on that one. It’s treat people fairly, don’t talk up a big game and choke in the first quarter, and don’t forget the second most important piece of advice from the father.

<The day you think you know everything, is the day life will make you realize how little you don’t>

My dad is fond of saying that after 30 years, he still learns something new everyday. It’s true. A man who has been around airplanes all of his life still finds them fascinating because he can never truly grasp everything there is to know about them. Because aviation is so fluid and constantly evolving, I think that’s what keeps things fresh and interesting in our industry. But don’t ever think that you know it all. I’ve been around guys like that and it’s sad sometimes…you have the right answer 15 ways from Sunday and they don’t want to listen. They don’t want to learn. They don’t want to evolve. They’re the old propeller planes in an age of Dreamliners, (nothing against the old school, just the old school that’s stuck in their ways).

So to recap, always protect your reputation, once it’s gone it’s gone. People don’t forget in this industry. You can never know everything there is to know about this industry. The day you think you do is the day you get in trouble. Stay curious, stay above the clouds, and keep a positive attitude (no pun intended with that last one). You just closed on some good advice.


Add on: How I “Paid” for a Second Degree

As a continuation of my last post, How I “Paid” for a Second Degree, I just wanted to provide a small list of companies that offer some type of assistance. You can go to each one’s website and look for employee benefits to get the details.

Thanks to the folks at USA Today, they compiled the following list in no particular order:

  • AT&T
  • Bank of America
  • Baxter
  • Best Buy
  • BP
  • Comcast
  • Disney
  • Jet Blue
  • Publix
  • Smuckers
  • UPS
  • Verizon
  • Wal-Mart
  • Wells Fargo

Of this list, Smucker’s program was the sweetest, offering up to 100% of tuition costs for college courses approved by management. They are definitely spreading the wealth. They can get you out of a financial jam. Ok, I’m done with the jelly references. There are plenty of companies that offer this amazing benefit and all you have to do is ask and meet certain criteria.

In the next posts we’ll discuss other methods of paying for a secondary education including: student loans, grants, scholarships, and more. If you’re currently with an employer that offers this assistance; however, this route is your best bet. As a famous band once wrote, “You’ve got to bet on yourself now Star…Cause that’s your best bet.” Now go close on some free tuition.


How I “Paid” for a Second Degree

I went to college for Business Administration with a focus in Management and realized that with what I wanted to do in my career, this degree was not particularly useful. Last year I decided that I wanted to go back to school to earn my degree in Finance, but I was really worried about the costs. With my schedule, and geographic distance from top schools, I decided that an online degree was the best way to go. So I researched a lot of different schools and narrowed it down to my top five. I applied to all of them and got in to my top three schools. I chose the one I thought would be best suited for my career path and figured out how much it was going to cost me.

Now granted, I thought to myself <it wasn’t going to be much…no dorm, no campus fees, meal plans, lab fees, athletic fees, can’t be that much right?> I’m not going to lie, tuition is expensive no matter how you slice it. I was making good money at my current job and I could pay for it, but I didn’t want that eating away my retirement or limiting my ability to do certain things (travel, go out and enjoy a nice meal with Mrs. ABC). So I spoke to my HR and asked them if they had this magical thing called Tuition Reimbursement. Now before I continue let me just say this…I was extremely lucky that A. my employer offered this assistance and B. that my manager approved it because it was deemed to benefit the company.

So my particular employer offered 100% tuition reimbursement for undergraduate studies at a certified institute of higher education. CA-CHING! Not only tuition but they also covered technology fees and books, up to a certain amount. Now, not all tuition reimbursement programs are created equal. Some won’t cover 100%, some won’t cover books, some may require you to sign an agreement to stay on with the company and if you leave you have to return the money. So it’s important that you read all the fine print before taking advantage. But I will say, IF your employer offers this and you don’t take advantage…YOU ARE LEAVING MONEY ON THE TABLE. Some employers even offer tuition reimbursement for an MBA, which could easily cost $40,000 a year. Most MBA programs through an employer will require a two-year commitment, but hey…an MBA will dramatically increase your earning potential and you can think of the two year commitment as a guarantee that the company is invested in your future growth with them.

So back to my case…my employer offered 100% tuition reimbursement and were really good about paying it in a timely manner. But here’s another trick I found…my school offers a Tuition Deferment option which basically gives you 90 days from the time you FINISH the semester to pay your bill. How awesome is that? Your company pays the tab, and your school gives you a quasi “credit line,” interest free, to pay off the balance with the money your employer is going to give you to pay it.

This is where you need to do a little research and not be scared of any stumbling blocks along the way. Ask your HR department if they have tuition reimbursement, and if they do, get all the details about it upfront before you apply. Have a discussion with your boss…convey the fact that education is a top priority for you, and that you would really appreciate their investment in your growth as a valued member of their organization (you may have to negotiate this point with your manager). Don’t barge in and say hey, <insert company name here> offers tuition reimbursement, sign me up. Go in with a plan…try to tailor the degree you’re studying for around the needs of your company and/or job description. If you work for a bank, it’s going to be hard to convince your manager to pay for a marine biology degree right? It’s not a perfect system. But if you can convince your manager that the degree you are going for has some business case to make you a better employee, and thus make a better company, then you have a really good shot.

Don’t get disillusioned if your company doesn’t offer any kind of assistance, there are other ways to pay for your education. But, if it’s really important to you, then find a way to work into your compensation package. If you’re applying for a new job, ask HR if they have tuition reimbursement or ask the hiring manager and let them know this is a top concern for you. If you’re already on the job, have a conversation with your manager about going back to school and getting some assistance. Maybe instead of a bonus or salary increase, they can pay for your school. Trust me, graduating with higher education training will pay for itself in the long run if this seems like a crazy idea. The point is, the squeaky wheel gets the grease and you’ll never know if you don’t ask. You need to make it known that your professional growth now hinges on getting/finishing your education.

Employer provided tuition reimbursement is my favorite way I’ve found for professionals who want to finish their degree or start on the way to one, to pay for it. It shows that the company values you and they have confidence in your ability to learn and bring something new to the workplace. It also shows the company that you take your professional growth seriously and you have an open mind, dedication, and discipline to take that on. The best part is, depending on how you time it, you may not have to pay a dime out of pocket to take advantage. Think about that…time it right, and you won’t have to pay a dime out of pocket. This is an easy one ladies and gentlemen, now go close on some tuition reimbursement.



You ever hear the expression “it’s not what you know it’s who you know?” I will give some merit to that but you can know the president, not know your stuff, and still get the boot. That’s because “who you know” can transfer jobs, retire, get fired, not like you anymore…then what? Education my friends. Education is the first step to making it work in this life. The difference between median salaries for college grads versus non-college grads is enough to make your head spin. But it’s not all about the money. One of the most important things I learned in college was resourcefulness. It was learning how to solve problems when you had no clue. How to research. How to think critically. How to work in teams to get stuff done. These are skills which employers value and which gives the competitive advantage to those who have a college degrees or some type of formal education. I’m not saying you can’t learn those things without college, but I am saying you may not get the complete scope to put yourself on the same level.

But college is expensive ABC…I can’t afford it!

Yes, I realize college is expensive but if you think about the salaries you WON’T earn over your lifetime, it doesn’t seem like much of an investment. An INVESTMENT. Think about it as an investment. It’s not for anyone else but yourself. So when you think you can’t, or you’re too old, or it’s too expensive..dig in. Say to yourself, if I stick it out, save up some money, and earn this degree…you’ll be closing on a new life with new possibilities. You’ll realize that the problems of this world can be solved with your education. You’ll realize that you can solve most problems yourself so long as you apply yourself and your new found knowledge.

What about trade skills or apprenticeships?

Nothing against that…it’s an education…if you’re passionate about it then go for it. The important thing is to get your primary education (high school degree) and then some type of secondary education/training.

Bottom line is this, don’t sell yourself short by not getting more education. You should never stop learning throughout your life. Stay curious, stay focused on what needs to be done. Unfortunately most companies won’t even consider you if you don’t have some type of secondary education. Not for the jobs that pay great wages anyway. So are you going to let that stop you from achieving your dreams? You’re not going to school to learn rocket science (although if that’s what you want that’s awesome). There is nothing you can’t learn or achieve…all you need is dedication, time, and hard work. If I have to tutor you myself, or point you in the right direction, I will. But remember this…”Education is the most powerful weapon we can use to change the world” – said a very educated Nelson Mandela. Now go close on some books will ya?


Travel the World!

What does Travel have to do with ABC? Besides education, I think travel is the best way to open your mindset to new ideas and meet people that completely change your perspective on life. I was recently asked, “if I won the lotto tomorrow, what would you be doing?” My first thought was, well, it depends on how much I won. Let’s say I won enough to do whatever I wanted for the rest of my life…what would I do? Aside from the obvious answer <spend more time with family>, next on the list is travel. I truly believe that you’re making it if you’re making it around the world. For there are no greater lessons in life than those you learn when you go abroad. When I hear someone has never been outside of <insert home country here> I think to myself, GET OUT! Literally, get out of the country and go explore. It’s like you’re learning to walk and talk all over again…talk especially if you go somewhere they don’t speak your native tongue. You learn how different people really are, yet still share many of the same values you do. Stereotypes are usually laid to rest, you connect with people outside of the internet, you learn how others think and act and feel, and why they do so. But in order to do that you need to actually go to another country and experience it for yourself. I’m not talking one of these trips where you get off the plane, go to a resort, then get back on the plane. NO. You need to get an AirBnB or something and get out among the locals (use common sense here obviously, don’t go mingle in Iraq). Get some local cuisine, try the local beer, have a conversation with a complete stranger…TRUST ME it will change your life forever (in a good way of course).

Now some of you may be thinking, but I don’t have money to go jet setting around the world ABC. True. Travel can be expensive and seem like a far off thing to do. But guess what? You can do it on the cheap. Save up for a year or two, plan ahead, and go. Don’t think about it, just go. Why are you still reading this? Go! Seriously though, if it seems intimidating, expensive, too foreign, don’t worry, that’s what this blog is for…to help navigate some of these challenges so you can close on going abroad. I’ll share some of my travel experiences I’ve had along the way, and Mrs. ABC’s secrets to making it affordable (she’s the smart one in all this).

Start thinking about where you want to go. Just daydream a little. DON’T GOOGLE IT. Do I want to go to Mexico and see what real Mexican food is all about? Do I want to go to Grand Cayman and snorkel with all the undersea life? Do I want to go to Chile and sample some of the finest wines in the world. Do I want to go to France and have a Fry. Do I want to go to China and visit the Great Wall? The answer is “yes” my friends…to all of them. Now go close on some travel.


First Lesson

This section of the blog is dedicated to my passion in life (other than my wife), A V I A T I O N. I will post things that I have learned in my career that will hopefully shed light on certain areas that may interest you or are curious about in the industry. I have been in the industry for about 12 years now and currently work for one of the most recognizable commercial engine manufacturers in the world.

My first lesson is simple, an airplane is a fixed wing craft that is propelled forward by thrust from a jet engine or a propeller. For the purposes of this blog, I will keep it mostly to commercial, jet engine powered aircraft like the ones you typically see when you raise your head to the sky.

Looks something like this:

Image result for stock airplane photos

There are four forces of flight that everyone should know:

  1. Lift – simple enough, the wings generate life that get the airplane off the ground
  2. Thrust – primary force that gets the craft moving forward
  3. Drag – occurs when airflow hits a surface and causes resistance
  4. Gravity or weight – we all know what gravity is

I want you to try this cheesy experiment next time you are in the car (as safely as possible of course!). When you’re driving down the road, put your hand out the window and hold it out flat with your nails pointing in the same direction as you are traveling in. Now, slowly start to lift your hand up…that’s lift. You’ll notice some resistance against your hand as well, that’s drag. Your hand is basically an airplane at this point. Cool huh! Now put your hand back in the car, you need to close on the next post.